Your Coffee Choice reveals your Personality

Which coffee type are you?


For many people, the taste of freshly-brewed coffee livens up the day. Did you know that your preferences – such as if you like milk or sweeteners in your coffee – can reveal your personality? Click to discover what a leading psychologist says he knows about you through your coffee style.









Which Coffee Type are You?

What coffee drinking habits say about you

German psychology professor Dr. Alfred Gebert, who has studied coffee drinkers and their preferences, has drawn the following conclusions:

The “with sugar” drinker is “sweet” in every sense of the word. He or she is cuddly, playful and up for anything fun. This drinker might also be leisure-oriented and less career-ambitious. With men, this preference indicates the wish to never grow up.

But have you ever thought about where your coffee comes from?








Which Coffee Type are You?

What coffee drinking habits say about you

German psychology professor Dr. Alfred Gebert, who has studied coffee drinkers and their preferences, has drawn the following conclusions:

The coffee drinker who prefers to drink his coffee black is vibrant, active and very success-oriented. He is able to deal with any given situation and drinks his coffee like it is. He enjoys it, though he may feel a little jittery.

But have you ever thought about where your coffee comes from?








Which Coffee Type are You?

What coffee drinking habits say about you

German psychology professor Dr. Alfred Gebert, who has studied coffee drinkers and their preferences, has drawn the following conclusions:

The “milk and sugar” drinker is sensitive, delicate and sensible. Drinking coffee on the go, or standing up, is not for the milk-and-sugar type.

But have you ever thought about where your coffee comes from?








Which Coffee Type are You?

What coffee drinking habits say about you

German psychology professor Dr. Alfred Gebert, who has studied coffee drinkers and their preferences, has drawn the following conclusions:

Women with a sense of health and wellness favor coffee with milk. They not only care about appearance, but they also value inner qualities. These women are emotionally mature, compassionate and optimistic. Men in the midst of a midlife crisis are also commonly found within this group.

But have you ever thought about where your coffee comes from?








Coffee farming

How does your coffee get to you?

Getting the coffee in your cup means year-round work by talented farmers who cultivate coffee fruit, which is eventually roasted to extract coffee beans. There’s one special area of the world that coffee fruit usually comes from.

The exact farm location and the way farmers cultivate, process and turn their fruit into coffee beans will give every batch a unique flavor. So how do these farmers make such flavorful coffee beans?

Coffee fruit grows best in an area known as the Bean Belt – the equatorial region or band around the Earth in between the Tropics of Capricorn and Cancer – which is located from latitude 25 degrees North to 30 degrees South. This region has special qualities, including rich soils and mild temperatures, with abundant rain and shaded sun.

The two main types of coffee beans are known as Arabica and Robusta. While the characteristic note of Arabica beans is typically sweet, fruity, chocolaty and nutty, Robusta has a sharper and stronger taste and contains more caffeine. Robusta is often used for instant coffee.

 

Minas Gerais in Brazil

Diamonds, gold and ag treasures

The name of Brazil’s fourth largest state, Minas Gerais, originates from its mineral resources: diamonds, gems and gold. But the soil is not only rich in natural resources. It’s also suitable for growing Arabica coffee.

 

 

 

 

 

Expedito Alves Oliveira

A Coffee Bean Expert from Brazil

Meet Expedito Alves Oliveira: a lifelong coffee farmer who knows his fields like he knows his own children. And Oliveira knows coffee beans.

Born on this farm in Santana da Vargem, about 300 km south-west from Minas Gerais’ capital, Belo Horizonte, at the age of eight he began helping with simple tasks. At 22, he took over, cultivating an array of Arabica coffee varieties such as cauaí, mundo novo, topázio and rubi.


Since he manages 26 hectares, Oliveira is considered a larger-scale farmer within his community.


Green cherries are still maturing, while red, purple or black cherries are ripe.


Commitment: Expedito treats his fields as if they are family members – watching and feeding them, and keeping them well.


A long working day is over. But the hard work pays off: In recent years, Oliveira has been averaging 70 to 80 bags per hectare. And this year, Expedito beat his own record. “On ten of my hectares, we got around 120 bags per hectare.”


 

Coffee farmer with heart and soul

“Living out here is a joy”

Being a coffee farmer means little time off. Still, Expedito Oliveira loves his profession.

Coffee harvest

From fruit to bean

  • Following the stripping method, farmer Expedito Oliveira picks coffee fruit from each branch by hand.

  • Knowing the difference: The red fruit is ripe, whereas the brown fruit is overripe, and the green ones are unripe. Only ripe fruits make a good coffee bean.
  • In a large net, Oliveira collects all fruits. For the stripping method, he could alternatively use machines.
  • By tossing the fruit into the air, he filters coffee plants and beans from leaves and branches.
  • By putting all the fruit into a water tank, he separates and selects the pieces that are ready. Overripe fruit of poor quality, as well as plant pieces, will float on the surface, whereas unripe fruit sinks.
  • Now, the coffee fruit is ready to dry under the Brazilian sun. It can only be layered a few centimeters high.
  • This machine peels the dried fruit and extracts the beans from inside from the pulp. Finally, the farmer needs to select the best beans – by hand or with sorting machines.
  • At the end of this process, Oliveira has produced high-quality coffee beans, which will be delivered to coffee roast houses.

 

 

 

 

 

Connected through a new digital platform

What Bayer does to support coffee farmers in Brazil

To help Brazilian coffee farmers to increase their business, Bayer experts like Arilson de Oliveira provide technical and educational support. They also want to raise consumer awareness about the individual stories behind their daily cups of coffee. By purchasing coffee products on a new platform, shoppers will be able to discover a farm’s history, get to know farmers, see actual production photos and have the exact location of the farm on a map. This digital platform, called Made in Farm, is one of Bayer’s most recent innovations that will connect coffee producers and buyers in Brazil.

Made in Farm

With two different models, Made in Farm is a combination of e-commerce, logistics structure, customer service and sales. Producers offer their coffee beans, and the platform connects them with restaurants and coffee shops. It is also a negotiation platform that allows a direct relationship between buyers and producers and ensures autonomy for both.


Expedito Oliveira speaks with Bayer expert Arilson de Oliveira about the short- and long-term strategy of his farm.


Expedito Oliveira shows Bayer expert Arilson de Oliveira his processed coffee beans.


Together they evaluate how to further optimize the quality of Oliveira's coffee beans.


Coffee beans from Brazil −­ guaranteed to taste good!


 

Growing Coffee in Asia

Vietnamese traditions face economic changes

On the other side of the globe, about 18,000 kilometers away from Brazil, Vietnamese farmers traditionally grow Robusta coffee. Vietnam is the world’s second largest coffee producing country. In 2016/17, the overall coffee production in Vietnam is estimated at 26.6 million bags. Compared to the years before, this is a slight decrease, which is due to dry weather conditions. In the Central Highlands, some farmers have already decided to use more of their land to grow other crops, such as black peppers, avocadoes or passion fruit, which ensure a higher income.

Coffee grower Le Van Thong lives and farms in the city of Buon Ma Thuot (Ban Mê Thuột). Van Thong has been farming Robusta coffee for 40 years. Like many other farmers in the region, his farmland is small; he has two hectares, entirely devoted to coffee crops. Still, as coffee demand has increased over the last twenty years, Van Thong managed to increase production on his small piece of land.

This development requires careful planning and complete dedication to his farm work. Water management systems, such as drip irrigation, are among Van Thong’s biggest allies. “It reduces the amount of water needed, and I can apply fertilizers while watering.”

The Vietnamese government supports the implementation of new technologies like water systems. This system helps farmers increase yield and product quality, while minimizing the costs.

 

Brazilian coffee farmer Carvalho

“I love the land... most of all, coffee.”

Just like in Vietnam, coffee plantations in Brazil are dependent on good weather. Dry seasons can lower the yields significantly. Working until 11pm doesn’t dampen Brazilian farmer Hermerson Ferreira Carvalho’s passion for the coffee fields he takes care of. He is a small-scale farmer in Campo do Meio, in the region of Minas Gerais. For him, paying attention to nature conservation is extremely important.

 

 

 

 

 

Hermerson Ferreira Carvalho

Advances through technology

Carvalho wants to include more technological advances in his daily routine, to facilitate coffee harvesting.

Demand Generation: A Behind-the-Beans Story

Brazilian project improves small coffee farmers’ productivity

Bayer Brazil works together with its distributors to develop the technical and management skills of smallholder coffee farmers across Brazil, such as Hermerson Ferreira Carvalho.

Bringing the aroma of coffee beans into a cup

Enjoying his own coffee

After the long post-harvest period and processing of coffee beans, Expedito Alves Oliveira checks the quality of his finished products. While waiting for water to run through his roasted and milled coffee beans, he can enjoy a moment of relaxation. From the smell, he recognizes the unique aroma that his coffee varieties have.

Daily coffee routine: Each morning, Expedito and his wife enjoy coffee from beans he grew.


Freshly-brewed coffee provides Expedito and his family a great start to the day.


Coffee rewards Expedito during daily tasks on the fields.


 

Coffee consumption

No limits to coffee love

Many baristas respond to people’s desire for coffee by creating new recipes, served in specific cups. The list of choices – even in a normal coffeehouse – is endless: latte macchiato, cappuccino, espresso – with or without caffeine – filled with ice cream, cacao or caramel flavor...

In countries with lower average temperatures throughout the year, people seem to be especially fond of this warm energy booster.