Matricaria inodora

Scientific Name Matricaria inodora L.
Synonyms Tripleurospermum perforatum (Mérat) Lainz, Tripleurospermum maritimum subsp. inodorum, Matricaria perforata
Common Names English: Scentless false mayweed, scentless mayweed, scentless chamomile, wild chamomile, false chamomile, German chamomile; German: Geruchlose Kamille; French: Matricaire inodore; Spanish: Matricaria, margarita
Description Annual, seed propagated weed, up to 50 cm (19.68 inch) high.

Descriptions

Characteristic Features

Almost scentless, flower cups pulpy (M. chamomilla with hollow flower cup).

Cotyledons

Suborbicular, dense, oval, pointed at the top, quite long-petiolated, prostrate.

Stems

Erect, branched only from the middle.

Leaves

Alternate, glabrous, 2-3 pinnate, with fine, narrow, linear, spiny tipped segments.

Propagatio Organs

Flowers

Flower heads large, terminal and arranged singly on stems and branches. The involucral bracts are oblong-ovate and almost single-rowed.
Disc florets are golden yellow and ray florets are white, 12-20 and spreading.

Flowering Period

May-September.

Fruit

Fruit with calyx persisting (as 5 small lobes on the top of the fruit); dry; urceolate; indehiscent, 1.5 - 2.2 mm (0.059 - 0.086 inch) long; 0.7 - 1.2 mm (0.027 - 0.047 inch) wide brown (pale); glabrous; surface venation ribbed.

Seeds

Gray to black (often dark brown), 1.5 mm (0.059 inch) long, 3-angled and grooved, possessing some dormancy;
Germination in autumn and spring.

Viability Of Seeds

>10 years.

Propagation

By seeds.
10,000 - 100,000 seeds/plant. M. inodora is a shallow germinator.

Occurrence

Habitat

Most widespread weed of the Chamomile family on arable land in Europe. Found on ruderal sites, paths, etc., pastures, hayfields, cultivated fields and particularly along roadsides.

Soil

More or less acid soils, well supplied with water and nutrients, preferring a moderate degree of warmth to thrive, neutral loam soils or damp clay.

Additional Crop Information

Widespread agricultural weed in all crops, mainly in cereals.

Agricultural Importance

M. inodora is a major weed in Northern Europe with a deep root system. Methods of “Reduced tillage” in spring often fail to control plants that emerged in autumn. Scentless mayweed competes for water and light, interferes with combine harvesting and therefore reduces yield.

Control

Integrated Crop Management

Frequent shallow tillage in autumn and spring. A cultivator with mounted harrows is effective in controlling the seedlings.

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