Galium aparine

Scientific Name Galium aparine L.
Common Names English: Cleavers; German: Kletten-Labkraut; French: Gaillet gratteron; Spanish: Amor de hortelano, galio
Description Annual or perennial climbing weed, propagating itself by seed, up to 120 cm (47.24 inch) tall.

Descriptions

Characteristic Features

Rough, sticky leaves ("sticky weed"). The leaves form whorls at the stem nodes. G. aparine can grow upwards only by supporting itself on other plants.

Cotyledons

An elongated oval in shape, tough, fleshy, bluish-green, with a distinct notch at the tip.

Stems

Prostrate or scrambling, square in cross-section, often branching, with "sticky" hairs at the ridges.

Leaves

4-8 lanceolate leaves forming whorls at the stem nodes. Leaves are"sticky" by downward-pointing bristles.

Propagatio Organs

Flowers

Cleavers forms many-flowered cymes in the leaf axils, which extend beyond the bract. The flowers are small, white, inconspicuous and quaternary.

Flowering Period

May-October.

Fruit

Double schizocarp.

Seeds

Spherical, with densely packed bristles on nodules.

Viability Of Seeds

7-8 years.

Propagation

Approx. 100-500 per plant. The germination depth is 1-5 cm (0.39 - 1.97 inch), the weed never germinates on the surface. Germination is light-independent and emergence from a soil depth of 10 cm (3.93 inch) is possible.
The main germination period is in autumn and spring.

Occurrence

Habitat

G. aparine occurs in a variety of habitats, from sea level to mid-elevations in the mountains. The seeds crawl over bushes along forest edges and in thickets. It is also found in wet fields and clearings.

Soil

Galium aparine prefers fertile, humus-rich, nutrient-rich (high nitrogen content) soil and soils with a high loam or clay content.

Additional Crop Information

Cereals, oil seed rape, sugar beet.

Agricultural Importance

Cleavers encourages lodging and leads to a moderate-to-severe reduction in yield. It seriously interferes with harvesting and increases drying costs for cereals. Galium aparine is very competitive in fields with high nitrogen input since it impedes in harvest and increases grain moisture content; therefore, the economic weed threshold is very low (0.1 plant/m², 0.009 plants/sq. ft.).

Control

Integrated Crop Management

Less competition exists in corn and in fields with lower nitrogen input.

Related Crops

Choose directly from Category

Pests

Pests

Search directly for a particular pest

Diseases

Diseases

Search directly for a particular disease

Weeds

Weeds

Search directly for a particular weed

Choose by Crop